TransForm in the News

May 20, 2010

The GreenTRIP (Traffic Reduction + Innovative Parking) program provides a good model for consideration of transport and parking management in building location and operation. This program certifies new residential and mixed use developments that incorporate traffic and parking reduction strategies, with standards tailored to specific land use types. It was developed by TransForm (formerly the Transportation and Land Use Coalition), a San Francisco Bay Area smart growth advocacy group, with funding from the Bay Area Air Quality Management District, The Rockefeller Foundation and The Silicon Community Foundation.

April 22, 2010

In the good-news department, TransForm was named the highest impact non-profit in the Bay Area for combating climate change today by Philanthropedia, a foundation that researches and recommends non-profits for philanthropic donations.

"We're interested in helping donors give better and directing more money to the nonprofits that are having the most impact in their sector," said Erinn Andrews, Philanthropedia's Chief Operating Officer. Andrews said they had surveyed 97 climate change experts in the Bay Area who lauded TransForm's staff and Executive Director, Stuart Cohen, for their thorough research and dynamic advocacy. "They deserve our support so they can do even more," said Andrews.

"Transportation makes up 40 percent of greenhouse gases here in the Bay Area," said TransForm's Cohen. "That means to fight climate change we need to grow in a way that supports convenient communities where it is easier to walk, bike, carpool or take public transportation for more trips. Otherwise, we will not only fail to reduce emissions, but our cost of living will skyrocket."

April 15, 2010

As a follow-up to the article we posted on the GreenTrip certification of the Ohlone project in San Jose, GreenTrip just listed a few more certified projects.

March 31, 2010

Juliet Ellis of Urban Habitat and Mahasin Abdul-Salaam of Genesis represent, along with Public Advocates Inc. and TransForm, the organizations that brought the civil rights complaint.

March 30, 2010

John Knox White, program director for TransForm, a transit advocacy group, says BART's call for a series of public meetings is a result of complaints filed by his group and others.

"It definitely seems to be an indication that our complaint has caused BART to realize that they need to start looking at how to get public input into these large massive projects," he said.

March 15, 2010

TransForm’s Chris Lepe – the community planner for San Jose – says, if people aren’t involved, the projects are less likely to help them – and they'll simply oppose those projects.

March 13, 2010
The instability of funding for public transit and for rail is doubly bad news, because our future requires us to have more and better alternatives to driving everywhere for everything, as metro roads max out with population growth, and as we work to reduce carbon emissions and our dependency on imported oil. There is a glimmer of hope for a new national vision, and that brings us to the other D.C. development this week. Our own Sen. Barbara Boxer, who chairs the Senate committee that must write the bulk of a new transportation bill, announced that she is pulling this critical issue off the back burner at last and is pressing ahead. She held her first hearing on the bill, which she has aptly dubbed "Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century."
February 19, 2010
The FTA investigated the Title VI complaint filed in September by Public Advocates on behalf of Oakland-based community advocacy groups Genesis, Urban Habitat and TransForm.
February 17, 2010
February 2010 – TransForm presents documentation of its claim that BART painted an overly rosy picture of the connector.
February 15, 2010
BART "is going to need to do a very serious analysis, and that may include having to compare [the connector] to a rapid bus system. What [FTA Director Peter] Rogoff said is that their corrective action plan did not include that analysis," said TransForm's Stuart Cohen. "My guess is, ultimately, BART will have to include it, and they know they simply can't withstand the scrutiny. This project can't withstand any objective scrutiny by anybody."
February 13, 2010
"This is a great day for transit," said John Knox White, who works for TransForm, a transit advocacy group that has battled the project and joined in the complaint. "The FTA is saying there needs to be a lot more community involvement in the process."
January 28, 2010
Opponents, many of them members of East Bay social justice groups, argued that the commission should instead give the $70 million to ailing transit agencies and help their riders weather the recession. "In this climate, it is simply not an acceptable risk to take the chance of losing $70 million," said Rebecca Schneider, an Oakland resident who said she is dependent on transit.
January 21, 2010

John Knox White of TransForm, a consistent critic of the OAC project, said TransForm and its allies would continue to push for BART to complete more rigorous analysis of the project's equity impacts. He also said BART's response demonstrates an inability to understand the issue at hand.

"Nobody is arguing that there weren't public meetings on the OAC, the issue is that these meetings did not present accurate or credible information," said White. "BART's staff refused to present information requested by MTC Commissioners, the ACTIA Board, Port of Oakland Commissioners, the Oakland City Council, and members of their own Board, as well as Bay Area residents and community organizations."

"BART has already attempted a slapdash analysis of this project and it has been rejected by the FTA. It is not be credible to have BART staff rehire the same OAC consultants who were paid thousands of dollars to 'debunk' TransForm’s RapidBART proposal and the community," said White, referring to a May 2009 email from Tom Dunscombe, OAC Project Manager at BART, to several consultants on the project. 

January 20, 2010

The federal government has good reason to doubt a rail project that costs so much to serve affluent airline passengers, said Stuart Cohen, executive director of TransForm, an Oakland-based transportation advocacy group.

"BART has stonewalled the community," Cohen said, "and failed to consider cheaper alternatives that would better serve the community."

TransForm, Public Advocates and Urban Habitat all assert that BART could provide a much cheaper and just as fast service to the airport if it upgraded its current shuttle bus service rather than building the elevated rail extension.

With the savings, Cohen asserted, BART could make the shuttle bus free, a bargain compared with the $6 one-way trip BART has suggested it would need to charge for the system to break even.

January 20, 2010
John Knox White, who works for TransForm, a transit advocacy group that has opposed the project, said he hoped the commission would decide next week to give up on the project and instead give the money to Bay Area transit agencies to help them cope with their budget woes. "We can't see how MTC would raise $70 million in regional funding on this project," he said.

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